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Thursday, April 12, 2012

Are you ready?

Prepare your brain
After discussing my last blog on writer's block with my husband, he brought up an interesting thought...

Perhaps the conventional idea of writer's block is all wrong.

What if it's just our brain's way of saying…

You're not ready yet.

Sounds simple, doesn't it?

I believe, particularly in our culture, we have a tendency to want to rush everything.
(Go, go, go…!)

Then, when burn out happens, shock sets in; i.e. How in the blue blazes can the flow just stop?!

The ideas and suggestions I received on I(dent)ity Crisis were helpful, though. In part, because, when I think about it, they were treating that exact problem in the correct manner. By focusing the brain and making it work for the solution.

My favorite was to close yourself in your bedroom and play music fitting to the scene you're trying to write. Watch it play out. Visualize it. Manifest it.

I do most of that normally anyway… but while writing. The idea of sitting in a room to ONLY visualize seems like a great way to reconnect to the world and I intend to try it out later today. However, in the vein of not forcing things to happen beyond their own time… I also want to allow for the flow to return on it's own accord. Meaning…

I'm open to... nothing.

Maybe I sit. I visualize and still, nothing happens. Maybe I get great ideas, but the writing doesn't hit the page. That's okay. Because it's in this realm of thought that I can find peace again.

I know this story will unfold.

When it's ready.

When I'm ready.

9 comments:

TL Jeffcoat said...

You are on to something there. That music listening visualization does work. I do that in my office when I'm unable to get time to write almost daily. Never thought about it, but it does fuel my creative juices.

Chipper Muse said...

I agree with your husband on this, because I definitely get writers block when I'm not ready with the story somehow. Trying to force my way through it isn't productive, because I end up writing something that my readers don't buy into. Music can help me somewhat, but since I'm a musician, I tend to go into analysis mode sometimes when I'm listening to something. (As in, "Hey, listen to what they're doing with the drums!") That makes listening to music a problem for me when I write or create. So, what does helps me get through writers block is a combination of two things: (1) doing things where my mind can wander, like a long drive in the country or a long walk, and (2) keeping at my writing in some way, though not necessarily writing the scene I'm not ready to write. I mean writing a different scene for a different story, or a blog post, or something else to create writing flow.

Ray Plasse said...

Smart Husband!

Carissa Andrews said...

Excellent posts, guys! This has been a really interesting thing for me. Pendomus came so easily and I really never had any major road blocks until the ending. I feel like I've been working on this area forever now. I know I have it in me to finish it, but for the life of me, I didn't realize how entrenched this block was. How much I'd closed myself off from the story and flow of it all. It's been awesome to hear what others do to change and correct this. :)

Sherilyn Nicole said...

I completely agree with you (and your husband). Most people who live in the states aren't used to having to wait. They want what they want when they want it. Walmart at 2am? You got it. Pizza delivered at 4am? Coming right up. So to wait for the muse to kick in and do its job can be agonizing but that's one thing you can't put on your schedule. But that's why we love it... right?

Jack said...

Yup, I totally agree with Ray: Smart Husband! :)

Pavarti said...

I don't know, you know, writing is work. Sometimes you have to sit down and just do it. It's not always going to be the creative muse of perfection, there are times when like everything else it's hard. You can always go back and smooth out the rough edges but I think there's something to be said for just shutting up and doing it.

Perhaps you need to work on another project for a while.

Ashley Chappell said...

I definitely like your husband's take on this. There are times I forced myself to write through writer's block only to delete everything I'd slugged at the page later. Maybe if I stop thinking of the block as anathema to writing and start thinking of it as a sign that I need to develop the plot more I won't end up so frustrated. Or drink as much beer...

Carissa Andrews said...

I can so relate, Ashley! Especially when I write when sick. Everything I put to paper ends up in the bin. LOL!